Oyster Toadfish “Opsanus Tau”

Last updated on July 9th, 2022 at 04:59 am

The oyster toadfish, also known as the burrfish, is a species of marine perciform fish in the family Batrachoididae. They are found throughout much of the tropical waters. The oyster toadfish has a large head with thick lips on its thick body. It can vary from being gray to yellowish-brown with darker mottling.

They are mainly found in the estuaries and near-coastal regions all over the world, including on both coasts of tropical America (Central American Peninsula), Australia, Madagascar, Philippines, China Sea Islands, Gulf of Thailand, and some parts of Africa. They spend most of their time on the seafloor hiding in crevices, rock piles, or reefs.

The oyster toadfish prey mainly on crustaceans and mollusks that are found among rocks or coral. They also prey upon small fishes near their mouths that they suck into their mouths with a suction motion.

They are oviparous and reproduce through spawning. They spawn from April to September, where the male toadfish defends the eggs until they hatch about 30 days later. However, there have been instances of oyster toadfishes protecting their young for over six months.

Origin and descriptions

oyster toadfish

The oyster toadfish, genus Opsanus tau (previously known as Batrachoides), is also called “oyster cracker” or simply “toadfish.” Other common names include “oyster catcher,” “stout blowfish,” and “sea toad.” It is a species of fish from the family Batrachoididae which includes other marine fishes such as the goliath frogfish.

Oyster Toadfish has been found in the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, and the Pacific Ocean. They are also known as ‘mud-devils’. These fish can grow to a length of about 30 inches or 76 cm. They have a fleshy skin flap that covers their gills, which makes them look like an oyster. This helps to camouflage the fish from both predators and prey.

The Oyster Toadfish has been found throughout American coastal waters including Massachusetts, Georgia, Texas, Florida, and California among others. These areas are known as their natural habitat.

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Species profile

oyster toadfish

Oyster toadfish are found only in the coastal waters of North America, from Nova Scotia to Mexico. They can range up to five feet long and weigh as much as 16 pounds (although most adults are between one and three pounds). They are brown, gray, or olive-green with large heads and wide mouths.

Their eyes are on top of their head to help them see above the bottom where they typically live. They have a distinct dorsal fin that runs from their tail down almost half of their body – it is not only longer than other fishes’ fins – but also much more rigid and sharp. They also have a spine on their gill covers that can deliver an electric shock to predators or prey alike.

Scientific name

The scientific name of the Oyster Toadfish is Opsanus tau.

Color and appearance

Oyster toadfish are brown, grey, or olive-green with large heads and wide mouths. Their eyes are on top of their head to help them see above the bottom where they typically live.

They have a distinct dorsal fin that runs from their tail down almost half of their body – it is not only longer than other fishes’ fins – but also much more rigid and sharp. They also have a spine on their gill covers that can deliver an electric shock to predators or prey alike.

Oyster toadfish habitat

Oyster toadfish are found only in the coastal waters of North America, from Nova Scotia to Mexico.

Their habitat is typically on or near sandy bottoms, although they have been known to venture into deeper waters. They are typically nocturnal, spending the daytime hours buried in sand or mud and coming out at night to feed on crabs and small fish.

Their natural predators include larger fishes such as sharks and rays and also humans who value them for their delicious meat.

Size

Oyster toadfish can range up to five feet long and weigh as much as 16 pounds (although most adults are between one and three pounds).

Tank size

In order to house an oyster Toadfish in a tank, it should be at least 90 gallons.

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The aquarium itself should have plenty of natural hiding places and rocks that the fish can use for shelter. The substrate needs to be fine enough so that the fish doesn’t swallow any while feeding or during normal activity. Also, because they are aggressive fish, they should not be housed with any other type of fish.

Life cycle

The oyster toadfish spends most of its time on the bottom of shallow waters and estuaries, eating crustaceans.

When they are mating, a male oyster Toadfish will make a loud bell-like sound by contracting muscles around their swim bladder in order to attract female fish for mating purposes. The mating season is between May and June.

They are known to live up to five years in the wild, but it is not uncommon for them to reach an age of ten or eleven years old when kept as pets. The oyster Toadfish has bony skin that covers its body which protects it from predators. When threatened, they can inflate their bodies to make themselves much larger.

They are extremely strong for their size, so it’s not recommended that anyone who isn’t experienced with handling large fish try to catch them.

Are they aggressive or peaceful?

Oyster toadfish are extremely aggressive compared to other species. They have been known to attack humans, so they should be handled with care if you come across one near your home or on the beach!

Oyster toadfish care

oyster toadfish

Oyster toadfish are very difficult for home aquariums. Their large size and aggressive behavior make them more suitable for public aquariums, where they will act out their aggression on other fish species rather than the humans who come to see them!

Oyster toadfish diet

Oyster toadfish are usually fed live food, such as brine shrimp.

These fish will eat most types of seafood; in fact, they can be used for population control when other natural predators aren’t available! This makes them an ideal addition to any reef aquarium if tankmates like crabs and lobsters are present – oyster toadfish are usually not picky!

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The oyster toadfish is a great addition to any saltwater aquarium with the right tank mates. They can eat many types of small crustaceans, including crabs and lobsters when they’re present in the environment. If you don’t have these invertebrates in your reef tank, make sure you feed your fish small fish like brine shrimp.

Tank mates

Oyster toadfish are not reef safe, so it is best that they have their own aquarium. They are aggressive and will easily dominate smaller fish in the tank, as well as larger ones with bullying tendencies.

So, they should not be placed in an aquarium with other fish. They also need a large tank, so they won’t work for most home aquariums!

Water conditions

As for water requirements and temperature, the oyster toadfish thrives at a pH between seven and eight and a half. The water must also be kept at around 70 degrees Fahrenheit or higher because this is what these fish prefer — although it’s important to note that they can handle slightly cooler water.

One of the best things about keeping oyster toadfish is that they are very tolerant. They come from a wide range of areas in their natural habitat, which means success can be achieved across many water parameters!

They do need good water quality and low nitrate levels, however, so regular maintenance is important. Oysters also produce large amounts of waste, so be prepared to do heavy water changes.

In addition, they are aggressive fish and need a high-quality filter in the tank. This will provide them with plenty of oxygenated water throughout their lives!

Breeding

oyster toadfish

Breeding oyster toadfish is much more difficult. It has only been reported once, which means it’s very much a challenge!

To breed them successfully, you would need the right water chemistry and particular tank conditions. They also must be conditioned for breeding with live food or high-quality frozen food that mimics their natural diet of crustaceans and other small fish.

The breeding tank must also be kept at a constant temperature of 80 degrees Fahrenheit, which is quite high for an aquarium!

In addition to this, there needs to be plenty of caves in the tank — these are where oyster toadfish breed and lay eggs. Without them, they will not reproduce.

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Breeding oyster toadfish is not impossible; however, it’s quite difficult and would require a lot of preparation. So, you’re better off sticking with small fish for the time being!

Lifespan

Oyster toadfish can live up to 25 years if looked after properly!

Parasites and diseases

Oyster toadfish are not prone to many diseases, but they can get parasites. These include flukes and flatworms, which latch onto the fish’s body and burrow into their skin. If these become a problem in your aquarium, you should speak with an experienced aquarist or veterinarian for advice on how best to treat them.

They can also be affected by a condition known as head and lateral line erosion. This is caused by poor water conditions, so make sure your fish gets the best treatment possible!

Predators

The predators of oyster toadfish are not well documented, but they do face many threats in the wild. These include seals and large fish that can swallow them whole — as you would imagine, their spines aren’t much use against these attackers!

In addition, humans have long considered oysters a delicious meal and over-fishing have caused oyster populations to decline considerably. This means they are now considered an endangered species in some areas of the world, so it’s important that your fish is treated with care!

Oysters also face threats due to human activity and habitat destruction. Pollution can affect their natural habitats as well as introduce new predators into the ecosystem.

As a result, oyster toadfish need careful attention paid to their breeding and captive care. If you are prepared for this responsibility, then they can be excellent pets with very few problems!

Does it make good pets?

Oyster toadfish make great pets for experienced aquarists. They are not the easiest fish to care for, but they can be very rewarding!

Conclusion

If you have a large tank and want an unusual fish that is brightly colored, then oysters will provide lots of enjoyment. Just remember that you’ll need a better-than-average filter to keep the water quality high, and you will need to do some heavy maintenance!